Tessa Parkes

Tessa is Research Director for the Salvation Army Centre for Addiction Services and Research at the University of Stirling where she leads a number of research and knowledge exchange projects focused on the reduction of harms and promotion of health and well-being for those impacted by social and health inequalities.

Tessa has experience in the statutory and non-statutory health, social care and housing/ homelessness sectors as a front-line support worker, team leader, and mental health nurse, and has provided consultancy and training to a wide variety of organisations focused on service improvement to better meet the needs of healthcare users with mental health issues including related to problem use of substances. She has a track record of creating positive impact on policy and practice through research. For 20 years her research activity has centred on enhancing the experience of people who use health/social care services, with a clear commitment to social justice, health equity and advocacy for poorly serviced groups including people who use alcohol and drugs.

She has recently supported NHS Health Scotland’s Compliance study in the MESAS portfolio of MUP projects as Chair of the Research Advisory Group, participates in many national and local committees related to drugs and alcohol, is Deputy Convenor for the Drugs Research Network Scotland, and is a member of Research England’s Research Excellence Framework Equality and Diversity Panel.

Publications:

Parkes, T., Matheson, C., Carver, H., Budd, J., Liddell, D., Wallace, J., Pauly, B., Fotopoulou, M., Burley, A., Anderson, I., MacLennan, G., & Foster, R. 2019. Supporting harm reduction through peer support (SHARPS): Testing the feasibility and acceptability of a peer-delivered, relational intervention for people with problem substance use who are homeless, to improve health outcomes, quality of life and social functioning, and reduce harms: Study protocol. BMC Pilot and Feasibility Studies, 5; 64. https://doi.org/10.1186/s40814-019-0447-0

Stead, M., Parkes, T et al. 2017. Delivery of alcohol brief interventions in community-based youth work settings: exploring feasibility and acceptability in a qualitative study. BMC Public Health, 17, 357.

Fotopoulou, M. & Parkes, T. 2017. Family solidarity in the face of stress: responses to drug-use problems in Greece. Addiction Research and Theory. 25, 4. 326-333.

Current alcohol-related projects:

Parkes, T., Carver, H., Matheson, C., Pauly, B. Scoping the feasibility and acceptability of Managed Alcohol Programmes for people who are homeless with severe alcohol problems in community-based, third sector services in Scotland. 2019.

Parkes, T., Carver, H., Tyrie, P. How might the ‘Youth in Iceland Model’ for preventing substance use among young people be developed and adapted for use in Dundee, Scotland? Society for the Study of Addiction. 2019-2020.

Parkes, T., Matheson, C., Carver, H et al. (PI) Testing the feasibility and acceptability of a peer-delivered, relational intervention for people with problem substance use who are homeless to improve health outcomes, quality of life and social functioning, and reduce harms. National Institutes for Health Research (NIHR) / Health Technology Assessment Programme. 2018-2020

Masterton, W., Parkes, T., Park, K, Carver, H. How might access to, and engagement with, diverse forms of ‘green space’ support reductions in the use of alcohol and drugs among young people in Scotland?  An interdisciplinary feasibility and acceptability study. ESRC funded PhD studentship.

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