QMJC #1 Write-up

Meeting #1 (November 2020) – Lyons et al. (2016)

In our first meeting on Wednesday 11 November, we discussed Lyons et al. Facebook and the Fun of Drinking Photos: Reproducing Gendered Regimes of Power. Journal of Marketing Education. 2016: 45-53. doi: 10.1177/2056305116672888

This beautifully written qualitative paper examines the meanings which young adults attach to sharing drinking photos on Facebook, and explores how these practices are gendered.  The memorable title clearly conveys the topic, indicates the paper will focus on respondents’ perceptions (aligned with pleasure, rather than risk) and introduces the claim that ‘fun’ drinking photos ultimately reproduce gendered and heteronormative regimes of power.  The authors argue that while both men and women manage their online identities to some extent, the tensions inherent in performing an empowered and sexy femininity in the ‘culture of intoxication’ (Griffin et al 2013) lead to more intensive engagement by young women.  This curation of online displays (taking, uploading, tagging and untagging photos) is then disparaged as trivial and self-indulgent ‘women’s work’ by young men… [Read on]

Professor Carol Emslie

Read the full report on the SSA website

Qualitative Methods Journal Club Meeting #2

SARN is supporting Professor Carol Emslie (SARN Co-Chair) and colleagues at the Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) Substance Use Research Group to host the upcoming series of the Society for the Study of Addiction (SSA) funded Qualitative Methods Journal Club (QMJC) from November 2020 – April 2021.

The QMJC highlights best practice through its selection of good quality qualitative research papers. After each meeting, a summary of the discussion from the Journal Club will be made available on the SSA website: https://www.addiction-ssa.org/hot-topic/qualitative-methods-journal-club/


In our second meeting on Tuesday 15 December from 2pm-3:15pm on Zoom, we will be discussing: Drabble & Trocki (2014) Alcohol in the life narratives of women: Commonalities and differences by sexual orientation, Addiction Research & Theory, 22:3, 186-194, DOI: 10.3109/16066359.2013.806651 A PDF is available on PMC: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4063308/

You must register to attend:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qualitative-methods-journal-club-meeting-2-hosted-by-gcu-tickets-128496238709

This event is capped at 50 to encourage active and fruitful discussion. If you are registered to attend, please read and reflect on Drabble & Trocki (2014) before the meeting.


Save the date

Next meeting (also 2pm-3:15pm): Thursday 14 January

Qualitative Methods Journal Club Meeting #1

SARN will support Professor Carol Emslie (SARN Co-Chair) and colleagues at the Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) Substance Use Research Group to host the upcoming series of the Society for the Study of Addiction (SSA) funded Qualitative Methods Journal Club (QMJC) from November 2020 – April 2021.

The QMJC highlights best practice through its selection of good quality qualitative research papers. After each meeting, a copy of the paper and a summary of the discussion from the Journal Club will be made available on the SSA website: https://www.addiction-ssa.org/hot-topic/qualitative-methods-journal-club/


In our first meeting on Wednesday 11 November from 2pm-3:15pm on Zoom, we will be discussing Lyons et al. Facebook and the Fun of Drinking Photos: Reproducing Gendered Regimes of Power. Journal of Marketing Education. 2016: 45-53. doi: 10.1177/2056305116672888

You must register to attend:
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/qualitative-methods-journal-club-meeting-1-hosted-by-gcu-tickets-124228590057

This event is capped at 50 to encourage active and fruitful discussion. If you are registered to attend, please read and reflect on Lyons et al. (2016) before the meeting.


Future confirmed QMJC dates for the diary (also 2pm-3:15pm):

  • Tuesday 15 December
  • Thursday 14 January

Alcohol Occasionals 2021 – Call for speakers/proposals

*** Please note: We are no longer accepting new submissions ***

The 2021 SARN/SHAAP Alcohol Occasionals will be based on the theme of inequalities. This could include alcohol research regarding: deprivation; gender inequalities; COVID-19 and inequalities; BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) communities; progressive vs. regressive alcohol policy; the homeless (including Managed Alcohol Programmes). 

We are interested to hear from researchers from any discipline who wish to share their findings with an audience made up of fellow researchers, practitioners, policy-makers and the general public. We would particularly welcome presentations from new and early career researchers and/or international speakers. We envisage these events will all take place online.

Dates (all 12:30pm-2pm): Wednesday 20 January / Thursday 25 February / Tuesday 30 March / Wednesday 28 April

If you would like to present or have a suggestion for a researcher you would like to see present, please email c.graham@rcpe.ac.uk

Speakers should provide a short proposal (max. 300 words) and an indication of their availability.

Edinburgh hosts European alcohol policy conference

On 20–21 November 2018, Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems (SHAAP) hosted the 8th European Alcohol Policy Conference (EAPC). The conference was attended by a variety of stakeholders in the field of alcohol policy from around Europe, including researchers, government officials, civil servants WHO representatives, recovery community groups, and people with lived experience. The conference not only addressed the key issues in the field of alcohol but also shared success stories of approaches that work.

The six themes of the conference were youth, justice, recovery, health, gender, and economics. There was a great deal of discussion between presenters and audience members during the two days and particularly important was the added value of the experiences shared by people in recovery. A short film made for the purpose of the conference made the very point that only by listening to people in recovery can we support people to access recovery services and sustaining recovery.

One key celebration of the conference was the Alcohol Policy Award, which was given to Estonia due to their progress in new alcohol control measures. In recent years, political support has led to implementing policies that address the WHO ‘best buys’, including tax increases, regulations of alcohol marketing, and restricting the availability to alcohol in shops. You can read more about the award here.

© SHAAP/Malcolm Cochrane Photography

Another key feature of the conference was the launch of the new Alcohol Framework, which was announced by the Minister for Public Health, Sport and Wellbeing Joe Fitzpatrick. The Framework sets out 20 actions to reduce consumption, change population attitudes and encourage positive choices, and supporting families and communities.

Whilst having a European Perspective, the Scottish contribution to the conference was prominent. Of note was that the Alcohol Policy Team at the Scottish Government was awarded recognition for their “outstanding contribution to NCD prevention and control”, by WHO on behalf of the UN Interagency Task Force on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases (UNIATF). Furthermore, PhD student Annie Taylor from Edinburgh Napier University won prize for best poster at the 8EAPC for her poster on alcohol and pregnancy.

A report of the conference along with videos will be made available on SHAAP’s website in due course.

© SHAAP/Malcolm Cochrane Photography